What is ARIN?

ARIN is the American Registry for Internet Numbers. It is the organization responsible for the distribution of ASNs (Autonomous System Numbers) and Internet Protocol addresses, including public IP address ranges for both IPv4 and IPv6.


ARIN Region

ARIN is the North American Regional Internet Registry (RIR), serving Canada, the United States (including Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and minor outlying islands), Anguilla, Antigua and Barbuda, the Bahamas, Barbados, Bermuda, the Cayman Islands, Dominica, Grenada, Guadeloupe, Jamaica, Martinique, Montserrat, Sint Bathelemy, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, St. Pierre and Micquelon, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, St. Martin, Turks and Caicos Islands, the British Virgin Islands. In addition, it serves otherwise unserved parts of the world, including Antarctica, Bouvet Island, Heard and McDonald Islands, and St. Helena.

History

ARIN was incorporated in December 1997.

In 2002, after several years of support, ARIN recognized the incorporation of LACNIC, the Latin American and Carribean Network Information Center, serving Latin America and parts of the Carribean. LACNIC took over management for ASNs and public IP address ranges from ARIN for organizations based in this region.

In 2005, ARIN similarly recognized AFRINIC, the Africa Network Information Center. Before that, ASNs and public IP address ranges for sub-Saharan Africa had been managed by ARIN.

In 2012, recognizing that ARIN would soon run out of IPv4 addresses, but organizations in the region would still need new IPv4 addresses, the ARIN Board of Trustees passed a resolution allowing organizations holding IPv4 addresses to transfer some or all of those IP addresses to another organization, and to specify the receiving organization. Lee Howard, Senior Vice President of IPv4.Global by Hilco Streambank, was on the ARIN Board at the time and has said, “It was not an easy decision, and it seemed unfair that people would profit from resources they had received for free, but ultimately I believed that there was no better way to get IP addresses into the networks that needed them.”

In 2015, after years of effort at conservation, ARIN issued its last free block of public IPv4 addresses. ARIN still retains pools of addresses for critical Internet infrastructure, and to facilitate IPv6 transition technologies, but does not maintain a pool of unused addresses. ARIN has creating a waiting list, where organizations with less than a /20 of IPv4 space can request a /22. ARIN fulfills this list periodically from public IPv4 address space that has been returned or otherwise reclaimed.

Transfers

IPv4.Global, powered by Hilco Streambank, has brokered more transfers through ARIN than any other IP broker. We pride ourselves on being experts in their processes, and we maintain collegial relationships with many of the staff, so we know we can enlist their help when necessary.

How to Buy IPv4 Addresses

For organizations in the ARIN region wishing to buy IP addresses, the first step is to have an ARIN Online account. This is very easy to set up, if not already set up; follow the instructions there. Then apply to ARIN for pre-approval. To avoid speculators preventing IPv4 addresses from being efficiently deployed, ARIN requires documentation of a recipient’s need for IP addresses. The documentation required is not complicated, but an organization with inconsistent record keeping may find it tedious. ARIN is simply looking for documentation of how a network is using its current IPv4 addresses space, and how new IP addresses will be used. The part most organizations find tricky is getting a notarized office attestation: ARIN wants to make sure an officer of the corporation will attest that the documentation used to justify additional IP addresses is true.

The prospective IP buyer will need to log into ARIN Online, Your Records > Organization Identifiers, Select your Org. Then in the Org Info section, under Actions, select Request Transfer Pre-Approval.

Once pre-approved, and organization can ask to be placed on the Waitlist for up to a /22, unless the organization has more than a /20 in total. Or the organization can register for the online IPv4 market place at https://ipv4.global/auctions.

Waitlist requests will be automatically filled, and ARIN will notify the recipient.

IP buyers on the IPv4.Global marketplace can choose to bid in an auction, or find a block and “Buy Now.” Only those who have registered and been approved for the site can see the actual blocks listed, to enable them to perform any checks on the IP address blocks they think appropriate. Approval is not automatic, to protect our sellers from being contacted directly, especially by anyone not buying IP addreses.

Once the sale is approved (Buy Now or winning end of auction), our team informs you that you have won, with instructions on the next step. For ARIN, the next step is to log in to ARIN Online again and select “Transfer Resources.” ARIN will need the details about the block, and will assign a ticket number. Reply to the email we sent about the sale with that ticket number; we will relay it to the seller. We’ll send you the seller’s ticket number, so you can add that to the notes about the transfer; this makes it easier for ARIN to coordinate the tickets.

ARIN will also require you to pay a transfer fee ($300), and maybe a registration fee. Finally, an officer will need to sign the Registration Services Agreement. This is a standard form of agreement, and ARIN rarely allows significant changes.

How to Sell IPv4 Addresses

For organizations in the ARIN region wishing to sell IP addresses, the first step is to to have an ARIN Online account. This is very easy to set up, if not already set up; follow the instructions there. This is the first chance to make sure that there will be no issues with selling your address space; if the person responsible for your organization’s account with ARIN is no longer there, you will need to submit a ticket to ARIN to update that record, and provide appropriate documentation that you are an authorized contact.

You will want to make sure your company name in ARIN’s records is the same as the company name in your official company paperwork, such as your state’s corporate records. If not, you may need to use ARIN’s transfer process just to revise the record, as if it the new company had been through a merger and acquisition with the old company.

At this point, and maybe sooner, register for the online IPv4 market place at https://ipv4.global/auctions. We can help you collect the documentation ARIN will request. When you register, you can decide whether you want to auction your IP address block, or let someone “Buy Now.”

Auctions run for a set time, and go to the highest bidder. You can tell us how long to let the auction run, and what your minimum price is. “Buy Now” transactions can be set for a lower price to sell quickly (often within a day or a few days for a low price) or a higher price, waiting for a buyer willing to pay that price. In any case, use pricing from previous transactions to see what market conditions are: https://auctions.ipv4.global/prior-sales.

Once the sale is approved (Buy Now or winning end of auction), our team informs you that your IP address block has sold, and the price, with instructions on the next step. For ARIN, the next step is to log in to ARIN Online again and select “Transfer Resources.” You select the block from the list (organizations with multiple blocks may have several to choose from), and ARIN will assign a ticket number. Reply to the email we sent about the sale with that ticket number; we will relay it to the buyer. We’ll send you the buyer’s ticket number, so you can add that to the notes about the transfer; this makes it easier for ARIN to coordinate the tickets.

An officer will need to sign the Acknowledgement Letter, to certify that the organization is aware that resources are being transferred away. This is to prevent employees from stealing company resources. The letter must be notarized.

Finally, when both seller and buyer have completed their work with ARIN, the WHOIS database is updated, and ARIN revises the tickets. Once the database shows the buyer as the holder of record, we release the escrowed funds to you, minus our commission (which varies by size). Funds are usually received within one business day of the transfer being completed by ARIN, but occasional delays of a day or two are possible.

How to Buy ASNs

For organizations in the ARIN region wishing to buy an ASN, the first step is to have an ARIN Online account. This is very easy to set up, if not already set up; follow the instructions there. Pre-approval is not generally required: the requirements for an ASN are simply to be multihomed (that is, use BGP, the Border Gateway Protocol, with two other networks), or otherwise have a different routing policy than your BGP peers. Prior to the transfer, ARIN may request documents showing that you are (or will imminently be) multihomed, such as contracts or bills or peering agreements with other networks.

ASN buyers on the IPv4.Global marketplace can choose to bid in an auction, or find a number and “Buy Now.” Only those who have registered and been approved for the site can see the actual ASNs listed, to enable them to perform any checks on it they think appropriate. Approval is not automatic, to protect our sellers from being contacted directly, especially by anyone not buying ASNs.

Once the sale is approved (Buy Now or winning end of auction), our team informs you that you have won, with instructions on the next step. For ARIN, the next step is to log in to ARIN Online again and select “Transfer Resources.” ARIN will need the Number, and will assign a ticket number. Reply to the email we sent about the sale with that ticket number; we will relay it to the seller. We’ll send you the seller’s ticket number, so you can add that to the notes about the transfer; this makes it easier for ARIN to coordinate the tickets.

ARIN will also require you to pay a transfer fee ($300), and maybe a registration fee. Finally, an officer will need to sign the Registration Services Agreement. This is a standard form of agreement, and ARIN rarely allows significant changes.

How to Sell ASNs

For organizations in the ARIN region wishing to sell an ASN, the first step is to to have an ARIN Online account. This is very easy to set up, if not already set up; follow the instructions there. This is the first chance to make sure that there will be no issues with selling your number; if the person responsible for your organization’s account with ARIN is no longer there, you will need to submit a ticket to ARIN to update that record, and provide appropriate documentation that you are an authorized contact.

You will want to make sure your company name in ARIN’s records is the same as the company name in your official company paperwork, such as your state’s corporate records. If not, you may need to use ARIN’s transfer process just to revise the record, as if it the new company had been through a merger and acquisition with the old company.

At this point, and maybe sooner, register for the online ASN market place at https://ipv4.global/auctions. We can help you collect the documentation ARIN will request. When you register, you can decide whether you want to auction your ASN, or let someone “Buy Now.”

Auctions run for a set time, and go to the highest bidder. You can tell us how long to let the auction run, and what your minimum price is. “Buy Now” transactions can be set for a lower price to sell quickly (often within a day or a few days for a low price) or a higher price, waiting for a buyer willing to pay that price. In any case, use pricing from previous transactions to see what market conditions are: https://auctions.ipv4.global/prior-sales.

Once the sale is approved (Buy Now or winning end of auction), our team informs you that your ASN has sold, and the price, with instructions on the next step. For ARIN, the next step is to log in to ARIN Online again and select “Transfer Resources.” You select the ASN from the list (organizations with multiple networks may have several to choose from), and ARIN will assign a ticket number. Reply to the email we sent about the sale with that ticket number; we will relay it to the buyer. We’ll send you the buyer’s ticket number, so you can add that to the notes about the transfer; this makes it easier for ARIN to coordinate the tickets.

An officer will need to sign the Acknowledgement Letter, to certify that the organization is aware that resources are being transferred away. This is to prevent employees from stealing company resources. The letter must be notarized.

Finally, when both seller and buyer have completed their work with ARIN, the WHOIS database is updated, and ARIN revises the tickets. Once the database shows the buyer as the holder of record, we release the escrowed funds to you, minus our commission (which varies by size). Funds are usually received within one business day of the transfer being completed by ARIN, but occasional delays of a day or two are possible.


View Prior Sales
Register to Buy or Sell ASN or IP Blocks